Touring Tires

usmc84

New Member
Pilot Tires?

I'm new to this forum but ive heard that the Pilots are the way to go.
But how do I choose which model??
I'm not an agressive rider, no burnouts, crap like that. but would like the most traction 3-5k miles is acceptable to replace?.
How bout the Pilot Road2?
Any sugesstions?
Thanks
 
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va_rider

New Member
I moved you post, because for the mileage you're looking for, you'll be looking for Sport-Touring Tires...

The Pilot Road is decent, but it's shaped a bit like a car tire.... turn in tends to be slow, but mileage is high.

The Pilot Road 2 is a bit more expensive than the regular Pilot Road, but uses 2 compound technology, which make the edges a bit softer than the center compound, for increased grip. But, because of the shape of the tire, turn in is also a bit slow.

The Continental Road Attack is a high mileage sport-touring tire, with a more rounded shape compared to the Pilot Road. Mileage tends to be high, and handling characteristics are very like a full on sport tire.

Other Options :
Metzeler Z6
Avon Storm
Shinko Podium
Dunlop Roadsmart
Bridgestone BT021
Pirelli Rosso - Not quite as high mileage as the rest, but GREAT shape and CRAZY grip.
and I'm sure I might be missing a few...


Out of all of the above choices, here are my top 3
1. Rosso
2. Road Attack
3. Road Smart
 

usmc84

New Member
Now...What size?

Whats the dif. between the 180\55 and the 190\50's ?

i'm assuming the 190's are wider with less profile?

What size should i go with?

i'm thinking about going with the Continentials....:sinister:
 

va_rider

New Member
well... judging by your posts in other parts of the forum, I'm betting you have a Gen 1... in that case, the difference between the 180 and the 190 is that the 180 is the correct tire for the bike, and the 190 is not. The 190 would deform on the rim, and the bike will handle like crap.
 
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va_rider

New Member
no problem man... tires can be an interesting and sometimes hard choice... mileage is a factor for almost everyone, even if they like to ride hard, they'd still like to get as many miles as possible out of a set of tires... but by learning to ride "better" you can make tires last longer... years ago, I could only get 2000 miles out of a Pilot Power. I was riding hard, but I wasn't smooth at all. I was making hard down shifts, hard upshifts, braking a lot in the corners, and changing lean angles mid-corner and making correction quite a bit.... by smoothing out my riding style, all of the sudden, I can get 3500 miles out of the same Pilot Power....

Obviously, I don't know how you ride, so don't take any of the above personally as me criticizing the way you ride, I'm just making the point that smooth riding leads to tires lasting longer, even if you still ride HARD... also, riding smoothly will let you see the available grip actually given by most tires... your average rider cannot overpower the grip given by modern motorcycle tires... Most wrecks you see are not because of a lack of available traction, they are a result of rider error. Either the rider will let off the gas mid corner, give too much gas, hit the brakes, or change body position... all of these are wrecks because of rider error, and cannot be blamed on the tires... A good rider can travel just as fast, if not faster as a poorer rider on better tires on a given stretch of road.... assume rider "a" is on a bike with sport touring tires, rider "b" is on the same bike, with the latest, top of the line dual compound sport or track-day tires... Rider "a" has been riding for many years and is very smooth in the corners, using maintenance throttle, shedding speed before the turn begins, and picking a line and sticking to it in the corners.... Rider "b" is rushing into corners, hot on the brakes, once in the corner, they lean over, realize their lean angle is too steep, and make corrections to their lean angle and body position, then tromps on the gas for a hard exit... rider "a" makes better time through the corner, and rider "b" can't keep up... "b" starts pushing harder, meaning he comes into the corner faster, brakes harder, and then feeds it more gas to exit.... rider "b" overpowers his rear tire and low sides.... yet rider "a" on his sport touring tires rides on without problems.


Personally, I was rider "b" for a long time. I was getting outrun by rider "a" on a regular basis, and I never understood it, for a while, I was getting outrun by older riders on bigger, heavier, lower powered bikes.... after a while, I fell in behind rider "a" and followed his lines and inputs... now, I'm closer to being rider "a" than rider "b"... I followed the better riders and learned from them, I read a few books about riding theory.... every little bit helps...
 
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FZ1riderNY

Moderator
Oh my God!, I am rider "b". Holy crap. Your absolutely right VA. I have been conciously working on my entrance speeds, using less brake, and making smooth transitions using the throttle and letting the engine decel the bike. I've been getting progressively better but there is much work to do. It's all about getting comfortable with the bike as well. I haven't been on a sportbike since my Gixer750 back in the early 90's so it's like learning all over again. Anyway, I don't want to hijack the thread into another direction but when I saw the description of "rider b" I just had to jump in.

On another note, I am currently running Bridgestone 020's that came on the bike when I bought it. They were brand new. My next set with either be 016's or 021's. I am still deciding. The Bridgestones work very well for me. I just don't really care for the tread pattern on the front of my 020's. I have noticed that the "Blocked Tread Pattern" have problems with cupping. The newer 016's and 021's have a different pattern tread on the front which pretty much matches the rear.
 

usmc84

New Member
Rider A .... B or maybe even C ?

Thanks for the wealth of info!!
Well.....between riders a or b....i must be a "c". i have less then a few hundred miles under my belt so i dont know how hard, etc. im going into the corners? maybe im a "G" rider....for Grandma!!!
Anyway...ive been on two wheels for 30 years now but 29 plus of them have been in the dirt. I never had old ladies in their new Mercedes pull out in front of me in the woods or out on the track...what a new experience....i cant even jump over the old ladies like i could on a nicely groomed double jump. all i can do is brake hard and smile and of course under my breath call her every name in the book...but then again...thats someones mother right..???
another new experience is when it the slightest bit windy out and you go over 75 mph down the highway and you get this shaking thing going on pushing you in all directions...what the hell??? never mind that tractor trailer the almost sucked me under his 14-18th wheels.... so now that you know... im officially a self apointed..."c" rider!
you guys are great for info and sharing. i'll keep you informed of my skills as i try to get more experience this season..i think im gonna go for the Conti Road Attacks and get rid of the original tires with 6K on them for more grip, less slip.
ps-- do they have any triple jumps at your local track days?:) if not and you think i could learn some skills from a book and you wouldnt mind sharing,,,,please let me know..
 
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va_rider

New Member
look around at Barnes and Noble... pick up "Twist of the Wrist 2" by Keith Code.... read it cover to cover multiple times... (when it's raining or when you've got the time to REALLY concentrate) it'll give you a ton of things to thing about while you're out riding...
 

FZ1riderNY

Moderator
Thats a big 10-4 on that. Will do. Lord knows we've had plenty of rain. Today makes 7 straight days. I probably could have read the book 3 times cover to cover. Doe's he make a video as well??
 

NoCal

New Member
This thread is a great source of info.

I need some basic information, little help please.... ASPECT RATIO?

If a tire is mareked "120/70ZR17." This label indicates section width (120mm), aspect ratio (70 percent), speed rating (Z), construction (R), and wheel diameter (17 inches).

120mm is the width of the tire, correct?

70% is the aspect ratio (what does aspect ratio mean?) does a higher number mean the tire is flatter or more round? (about 70% of the tire touches the road OR ~30% touches the road)

In other words would a 5% aspect ratio mean the tire is almost flat or would that mean that only 5% of the tire is touching the road? Or is it something different all together.

I will also be picking up "twist of the wrist 2" today. I have read alot of Codes' articles already
 

Missyl1713

New Member
So the bottom line, I've gotten about 8000 miles out of my stock back tire, (GEn2), I put that mileage on since October of last year. If I want good mileage the Michelin's are the best choice? I'm buying THIS week..afraid I'm about to start seeing chords on the back tire. :) Oh...no burnouts, and I don't do track days.
 

va_rider

New Member
I think the Michelin Pilot Road carries the torch for the highest mileage... followed closely by the Metzeler Z6... which... I'm not entirely sure they still make the Z6.... after that, the Continental Road Attack / Road Attack 2, the Michelin Pilot Road 2, Pirelli Rosso, etc etc etc
 

OneSizeFitsAll

New Member
Michilen Pilot Road 2 is a great tire, won't square off as fast as the Road. I bought a set a month ago from Derbycycles.net
Very good price and fast service.
 

Gohot229

New Member
Conti Attack..?

Heres the scenario.... a ride across the US from our fair state to Cali. It's about 2,400 miles to my destination with a detour through Utah and down Interstate 15 to So. Cal. Heres the thing... it'll be basically a sacrifical tire, pileing up all those meaningless upright droning miles east to west. Currently I have Michelin Pilot Power ct II's, the front has about 4-5 hundred miles from new, and the rear down to about 6-800 miles left, mabe, if I ride easy, as I have been....(no launches or 8-10K lofts) just mild manners. Choices or suggestions V_A ...? , that is, both tires as a pair for this journey.
 
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