plugs

S

scout

Guest
hey, I have the 06, and changed the plugs out when I did the blocks, cause i was down there.

Unless you're doing the blocks, I'd not worry about the plugs.

At 25/26k miles, the plugs looked great and didn't need changing. But I already bought the plugs, so changed them.

Plugs are deep down. I had a WR plug tool that worked. You'll need to get the Yam plug tool, or aftermarket one. Since I did the blocks, I took the rad off. But I think you can do it without taking the rad off, but don't know for sure.

Disconnect one coil/cable at a time, remove plug, install new one, and reconnect coil. Go to next one. That way you don't get the cables mixed up.

Not a lotta room down there, so plan on it taking awhile because of the short ratchet throw.

hey, I'm wondering if that yam tool kit had a plug tool.
 

FZ1riderNY

Moderator
hey, I have the 06, and changed the plugs out when I did the blocks, cause i was down there.

Unless you're doing the blocks, I'd not worry about the plugs.

At 25/26k miles, the plugs looked great and didn't need changing. But I already bought the plugs, so changed them.

Plugs are deep down. I had a WR plug tool that worked. You'll need to get the Yam plug tool, or aftermarket one. Since I did the blocks, I took the rad off. But I think you can do it without taking the rad off, but don't know for sure.

Disconnect one coil/cable at a time, remove plug, install new one, and reconnect coil. Go to next one. That way you don't get the cables mixed up.

Not a lotta room down there, so plan on it taking awhile because of the short ratchet throw.

hey, I'm wondering if that yam tool kit had a plug tool.
I don't understand all the worry about changing the plugs. If you look in the tool kit that came with your bike, you'll see the spark plug tool that works just fine. It took me less than a half hour to do the plugs and that was before doing the AIS Removal. Just go slow and take your time. Put the socket down in first and then use the wrench to grab a hold of the neck to loosen the plug. Once you have it loose, use your fingers to loosen it the rest of the way. Then pull it straight up and use the joint to bend it until you find the easiest way to lift it out. Each plug has a different position to bend the socket to remove the plug entirely from the cylinder head. I wrote it down on a pad for each cylinder so that next time it will be easier. For example, for cylinder #1, once loose bend socket at 3:00 o' clock, Cylinder #2, bend socket to 9:00 o' clock, and so on. Set up your clock looking from the front of the bike towards the back looking down on the cylinder head. It is that simple. Just go slow and you'll be fine.
 

NJFZ1

Moderator
As hunter was saying the time to do the plugs is when you remove the AIS and put on the block off plates. You'll have plenty of room then...
 
S

scout

Guest
As hunter was saying the time to do the plugs is when you remove the AIS and put on the block off plates. You'll have plenty of room then...
For sure, but those block off plate bolts, four of them, are the REAL pain. Takes forever. I guess someone makes a good tiny ratchet tool, but those block bolts seem like they're 3 inches long.

My butt was so sore from sitting for like an hour foolin with them.
 

g-tec

New Member
i am little late on this thread :) , you need to remove the rad if you wanna change the plugs, i do it few weeks ago, just look in the service manual and follow those steps, its very easy. this is time when you should change your coolant to, its only few bucks extra. the reason why yamaha change plugs on every 20000 km is that because the plugs can die while you are riddin, so imagine that you are in some state where is no services
 

Gian T. Balls

New Member
I found a great way to remove and install plugs. But it only works if everything is clean....... wait for it.......
A rubber hose!
Vac or fuel hose works great. You just need it big enough to slide over the plug, and long enough to reach down the hole (6 to 8").
All you do is, break the plug lose with the socket. Push the hose over the end. Spin it out. No joints, no mess and no fighting. installing, reverse order, and when it's tight the hose just spins off the plug. then put the socket on to torque it to spec.

Speaking of clean. It's a good idea to clean out the plug holes before you pull the plugs. Or all of that junk that gets kicked up from the road is going to go somewhere, and you don't really want it in your motor.

Also, Anti-sez on the treads is a very good idea.
 
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Jonathonsdaddy

New Member
2009 spark plug replacement

I just changed my plugs yesterday and did not have any major issues.

The part that made the big difference was dropping the radiator down and forward to get more room for my big hands to

get in there. I did not remove the radiator I just pulled the upper hoses off and remove the mounting bolts .

You will probably have some coolant come out of the radiator when you pull off the hoses, so save it to put back in when your done .

The 2 electric fan connectors are buried under the tank area and I did not want to lift it .

The spark plug wrench in the bikes tool kit worked great , I just used a 17 mm socket and rachet on the top of it to loosen / tighten

the plugs .

FYI the coil packs will come out easily if you spin them first to loosen the seal they have created from being there a long time !

Willow springs opaque 8.7.10 015.jpg
 

delbert

Member
I just changed mine for the second time , just dropped the rad off its mounting no removing of hoses ,, std plug socket , couple of different sized extensions and a ratchet ,, did it quite easily , really not that difficult if you take your time
 

Bluey

Member
I'm not sure how you guys do it. I had to remove the radiator and I still found it difficult to remove and replace the ignition coil assemblies. The No 3 was particularly hard to get back on and seat properly. If the radiator was in place, even loosened, I don't think I could have done it. Anyway the improved access allowed me to use a torque wrench to install the new plugs. I did note that the specified torque was reached after approx 1/2 a turn.
image.jpg
What I did find, was, when I removed the plugs there wasn't much resistance. I wouldn't say they where loose but very little effort required. The colour of the tips were good but there is some corrosion on the thread.
image.jpg
I'm guessing this is because the plugs weren't sufficiently tightened and not sealing properly. Anyway it's all back together and running like a charm. I'm very happy that I used the iridium plugs because the longer service life means I won't have to go through this again for quite a while. (Maybe not quite 100,000 miles:p). On the up side at least I got to use most of the tools in my tool box.
 
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Bluey

Member
Bluey , I can not see your plugs number, the CR9EK recommended for the bike should be a 2 grounded electrode type?
Fisherman thanks for your concern but dschult2 is correct. NGK recommend two plugs for the FZ1. The standard CR9EK and the Iridium CR9EIX.

image.jpg

The Iridium has a small centre electrode and single outer electrode.

image.jpg

NGK claim a service life of 60,000km.

image.jpg

I had the CR9EIX's installed at 20,000km and have just pulled them at 60,000km. After 40,000km the bike was still running fine but I figured it was time for a new set.
 
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old sparks

New Member
I found a great way to remove and install plugs. But it only works if everything is clean....... wait for it.......
A rubber hose!
.
I will try a rubber hose, because the first owner did not include the toolkit when I bought the bike.

I have to install AIS block off plates, new air filter, plugs, coolant and SS brakelines, so I will be removing the rad completely. I will also install my new radiator screen/cover...

Q. Will a standard spark plug socket fit if I remove everything?

tia
 
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